Natural remedies for insect bites

February 26, 2012

Healing, Inflammation, Recipes

Itching and pain occur because the insect injects venom or another irritant, which causes an allergic reaction. In most cases, these reactions are bothersome but not dangerous.

by Laura Orsini — 

It is that time of year again — time to get outdoors and enjoy the beauty of nature. With the pleasure, though, often comes the pain and irritation of insect bites. Itching and pain occur because the insect injects venom or another irritant, which causes an allergic reaction. In most cases, these reactions are bothersome but not dangerous.

Most bites and stings can be easily treated at home. However, severe reactions like anaphylaxis can occur, resulting in shortness of breath and tightening of the throat. Because anaphylaxis can affect the entire body in just minutes, sometimes fatally, it is important to call 911 in such an emergency.

The first thing to do when treating an insect bite is to remove the stinger. Be careful not to squeeze it, though, as this may inject additional venom or poison. Next, clean the affected area.

Home remedies for insect bites

• Crush plantain leaves; extract the juice and apply to the affected area.

• Apply toothpaste to the sting site.

• Pour peroxide over the affected area.

• Apply a poultice of granulated sugar to the bite wound to prevent scarring.

• A homeopathic remedy called Cantharis 30c is good for bee or wasp stings.

• A homeopathic remedy called Urtica urens 30c works well to relieve itching, burning and pain.

• Applying a slice of raw onion to a bite will discourage infection and help draw the poison out.

• Apply echinacea lavender sting poultice.

 

Echinacea Lavender Sting Poultice

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon echinacea root tincture
  • 1 tablespoon distilled water
  • 1/8 teaspoon lavender essential oil
  • 1 tablespoon bentonite clay

Instructions:

Mix the echinacea, water and lavender oil. Add the liquid slowly to the clay, while stirring. Once mixed, the resulting paste should stick to the skin. Apply to the injured area. Store the poultice in a tightly lidded container. If it dries out, add a small amount of water until it is moist enough to stick to the skin.

 

Laura Orsini is a writing, marketing and design consultant who works with speakers, authors and coaches. 602-518-5376 or www.writemarketdesign.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 29, Number 3, June/July 2010.

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