Botox results without botulism

Whereas Botox has the short-term effect of muscle-freezing to disable the skin from creasing, homeopathic formulations work to stimulate your own collagen production.

by Beata George — 

Botox®, the popular wrinkle plumper-upper, turned out to be more dangerous than advertised. Researchers discovered earlier this year that the botulinum toxin can travel from the injection site into the brain in lab animals. Whoops.

It should not have come as a big surprise. Preclinical testing showed some evidence that the toxin slipped into the human bloodstream and the lymph system. And there were those nasty adverse effects — people who got Botox to erase their wrinkles sometimes ended up with eye spasms, paralysis and difficulty swallowing.

Botox and the similar product, Myobloc®, carry warning labels about possible adverse reactions near the injection site, such as drooping eyelids and severe difficulty swallowing in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Russell Katz of the FDA states that people getting Botox for cosmetic reasons should “be aware that there’s the potential for the neurotoxin to spread.” (April 2008)

There is a safe alternative called “No-Tox.” It uses homeopathic formulations instead of a neurotoxin.

Whereas Botox has the short-term effect of muscle-freezing to disable the skin from creasing, homeopathic formulations work to stimulate your own collagen production.

Collagen constitutes the connective tissue that holds our bodies together in strong fibers — stronger even than steel wire of the same weight. Collagen forms the elaborate matrix called elastin that gives our bodies form and supports our organs. Elastin keeps skin firm and gives it that flexible, youthful appearance.

The homeopathic No-Tox preparation makes use of both collagen and elastin, just as Mother Nature does. The formulations are made by the Italian company, Guna. They are available by prescription only and must be administered under medical supervision.

No-Tox can be injected into wrinkles and lines. Or better yet, certified technicians can use a mild charge (a microcurrent) to penetrate the skin and stimulate a wider area.

The Guna formulations are not merely fillers. They stimulate the metabolism of the connective tissue, and unlike Botox, they produce a cumulative effect over time.

 

Beata George, originally from Poland, ran a highly successful spa in Canada. She has a diploma in Bio-Energy Therapy, is an esthetician, an internationally-certified aromatherapist and a registered Polarity therapist in Phoenix, Ariz. 602-992-1199.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 5, October/November 2008.

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