Breathing for pain and depression

Pain, for the purpose of this article, is nothing more than the lack of circulation, whether it is of the mind, body or spirit.

by David Berger — 

Pain, for the purpose of this article, is nothing more than the lack of circulation, whether it is of the mind, body or spirit. When circulation is restricted in any of these bodily components, the whole body hurts, in one form or another.

In most cases, the hurting starts in the energetic regions of our existence. Emotions are the energies that move through us, either inwardly or externally.

The internal direction, or the stuffing of the emotions, leads to depression. Depression is the most painful of all emotions because, like the rest of them, it has chemical equivalents that build up in areas with little or no circulation. This lack of endurance causes deposits to collect in the emotional or the physical body. When energies collect in the physical realm, they cause depressed functions, such as tumors.

Most of us understand that depression is anger turned inward; anger is unexpressed, unreleased emotion. When we release the emotional/chemical connection, circulation is restored, allowing the body to heal.

The simplest way to increase circulation is to breathe. There are really only two steps to breathing: breathe in, breathe out. Holding your breath is not a step, so do not hold your breath … just breathe.

Breathing causes oxygen to move through the body into areas that are stuck and breaks up the chemical deposits. As these energies emerge, they can be healed. Perhaps one of the best aspects of this process is that breathing brings up small bits of stuck energy, one at a time, preventing us from becoming overwhelmed.

Breathing enables us to see the light of day, little by little, but makes a huge difference in our overall health.

 

David Berger is a licensed massage therapist who works with individuals as an emotional intuitive, assisting the release of cellular memory from the body through acupressure. 480-513-7631.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 25, Number 6, December 2006/January 2007.

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