Cellular memory

 Studies have shown that recipients have experienced behaviors, personality traits, food cravings or interests they had not experienced in their lives before the transplants.

Studies have shown that recipients have experienced behaviors, personality traits, food cravings or interests they had not experienced in their lives before the transplants.

by Nancy Beauchamp — 

Cellular memory was first studied and documented in anecdotal reports of organ recipients. Studies have shown that recipients have experienced behaviors, personality traits, food cravings or interests they had not experienced in their lives before the transplants.

Every disturbance of the body, either real or imagined, evokes a stress response. The effects of molecular and cellular changes in the brain eventually result in behavioral adaptation. Prolonged exposure to stress, though, may lead to maladaptation and may even be a risk factor for diseases like major depression in genetically predisposed individuals.

Virtually every behavioral pattern exhibited during the routine activities of daily living results from learned data that is stored or encoded as cellular memory. Most of those behavioral patterns are benign, in that they do not contribute significantly to cellular destruction (i.e., disease). Some of those patterns, however, are expressed as significant reflections of traumatically encoded cellular information.

In order for therapy to have a lasting effect, it is imperative that a primary focus of intervention be the isolation and decoding of the causative traumatic cellular memory pattern.

For survivors of trauma, the conditioned reflex, as described by Pavlov, takes on tremendous significance in that all the information associated with the trauma is encoded at the cellular level. That is, the conditioned reflex works by association. Rather than a simple stimulus-response mechanism, the conditioned reflex is associated with memory.

We’ve all experienced hearing an old song and remembering something about the time when it was popular, or smelled Old Spice or Lilies of the Valley scents and remembered parents or grandparents who used to wear them. These experiences are held in the cells until they are triggered. When negative emotions such as anger, frustration or resentment are triggered, an unhealthy response occurs. Sometimes, when the memories are unconscious, we respond to the triggers and may not understand why.

Using techniques to get us in touch with the cellular memories will help us become or remain healthier. Releasing techniques include hypnosis and integrative imaging. When we can consciously release the memories, we become free. Free to respond in new, healthier ways. Wouldn’t that be a great way to live our lives!

 

Nancy Beauchamp has a bachelor of science in nursing and has spent almost 26 years as a hospice home-care nurse. She has received reflexology and integrative imaging certificates and is currently working at QuantumPathic Center of Consciousness as a medical researcher. She offers private sessions. www.QuantumPathic.com or 480-262-7126.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 25, Number 1, February/March 2006.

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