Choosing the right salt

Salt, derived by natural processes, has an abundance of more than 80 different minerals and electrolytic nutrients. It matches very closely the content of the oceans and seas of the world, as well as the inner ocean of the human body.

Salt, derived by natural processes, has an abundance of more than 80 different minerals and electrolytic nutrients. It matches very closely the content of the oceans and seas of the world, as well as the inner ocean of the human body.

by Justin Petersen — 

Everyone is familiar with the taste of salt. And yet its particular taste, although quite distinctive, defies description by even the most gifted writer. Try to imagine explaining the taste of salt to someone who has never tasted it. It is actually quite difficult. You could say that it tastes bitter, in a way; or that it has a “bite” to it, sort of; but to truly understand the taste of salt, you must experience it for yourself.

Salt, derived by natural processes, has an abundance of more than 80 different minerals and electrolytic nutrients. It matches very closely the content of the oceans and seas of the world, as well as the inner ocean of the human body. The blood running through our veins, as well as the fluids which bathe our cells inside and out, are nutrient-rich and made up of sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium and magnesium, just to name a few of the electrolytes we require for proper cell and nerve function.

Even the intravenous fluids (IVs) used in medicine are more than just water; they contain a specific combination of these electrolytes. That being understood, does it make sense to restrict our dietary consumption of one of these very important electrolytes — salt? The answer may not be as simple as you would expect.

When talking about refined salt, pure NaCl, the answer is a resounding, “Yes!” Whether iodized or not, refined salt is completely stripped of all the other minerals normally found in conjunction with it. It does make complete sense to restrict our intake of this type of commonly used salt, as it will cause an imbalance within the body and make it difficult to obtain a homeostatic level of electrolytes.

However, if you are talking about a more natural form of salt, like Celtic salt, which contains more than 80 different minerals and nutrients in combination with the sodium itself, then the answer about restriction is no. Restricting the use of this type of balanced salt product, with its myriad minerals and nutrients, makes achieving homeostasis, or bodily balance, more difficult.

You see, the body constantly strives to maintain homeostasis and avoid the extremes at either end of the spectrum. We should approach life this way in general, and help our bodies obtain the balance they need in every way we can. Using Celtic salt in our daily diet is a good start.

 

Dr. Justin Petersen is a doctor of chiropractic who focuses on functional healthcare with attention to nutritional biochemistry and muscle testing as a somatic window into the nervous system. He has a massage therapy background with recent licensure and massage training in Texas. drjustin@earthlink.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 24, Number 5, October/November 2005.

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