Dealing with loss during the holidays

Dealing with loss during the holidays

The most devastating loss, however, is the loss of a loved one, a relative, friend, pet or lover. The worst thing about grief or loss is that there is no cure. All we can do is learn how to manage it

The most devastating loss, however, is the loss of a loved one, a relative, friend, pet or lover. The worst thing about grief or loss is that there is no cure. All we can do is learn how to manage it

by Dannette Hunnel — 

The holiday season can be a catalyst for feelings of loss. Loss is descriptive individually, as it can involve anything from a relationship breakdown, empty nest syndrome, or loss of a limb to having a car repossessed. Other common losses are loss of status, a job or a treasured possession, or anything to which one has been attached.

The most devastating loss, however, is the loss of a loved one, a relative, friend, pet or lover. The worst thing about grief or loss is that there is no cure. All we can do is learn how to manage it.

A perfect temporary relief remedy to turn to during an overwhelming sensation of loss is Ignatia Amara, one of the top 50 homeopathic polychrests. One of the most widely used homeopathic remedies, polychrests are remedies that have more than one use or cure many diseases. Most people would benefit from Ignatia at some point in their lives.

Ignatia is a climbing shrub native to Asia that belongs to the Loganaceae family and is named for the Jesuit priest, Ignatius of Loyola. The remedy is made from the St. Ignatius bean, which is the corticated berry, or seed. Each seed is separated from the pulp, powdered and mixed with milk sugar, then formed into dissolvable pills. It has a high alkaloid content and reacts on the nervous system. Dr. Samuel Hahnemann discovered Ignatia in 1795, finding it helpful for mood changes during thoughts of loss.

Symptoms of those who might benefit from Ignatia are increased sighing and yawning and an indication of having difficulty expressing emotions. A manifestation of aversions to cigarette smoke, stuffy atmospheres, crowds, noises and bright lights can occur. Sensitivities are heightened and one can be easily offended or hurt.

On a physical level, twitches, tics, cramps, constrictions and spasms may develop in the throat, back or rectum. Also, coughs will feel tight and a tendency to become chilly is reported, which improves with sun and warmth. Pains tend to occur in very circumscribed areas, such as a headache that feels like nails are being hammered into one spot, or an ache in a single part of a muscle or joint.

Additionally, persons requiring Ignatia are often fainters. They have strained facial expressions and are prone to facial grimaces. Emotionally they may feel empty inside and heartbroken, with a feeling of desolation.

Ignatia can be purchased over-the-counter. Follow the directions on the label — usually four pellets under the tongue, three times daily, taken for three to four days.

Other things can be helpful in assisting with grief at this time of year. Change the pace and surroundings during the holiday season. Seek other locales, maybe different people, as well. Exercise as much as possible, eat four to five small nutritious meals daily and avoid alcohol. Start a new tradition, stay in and get lost in a good book or craft, or enjoy a long movie marathon.

The holidays are actually just a couple of days, so plan ahead and stick to the plan. And most of all, remember this too shall pass.

Known as a homeopathic Prozac, Ignatia is a short-term remedy used for emotions. Please keep in mind that sorrow is not pathology. If prolonged symptoms exist, a full homeopathic evaluation is in order.

 

Dannette Hunnel is a retired homeopath and author, dedicated to research, consulting and teaching. homeopathicstaff@gmail.com or 602-418-0505.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 33, Number 6, December 2014/January 2015.

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