Dental compatibility tests

When dental materials are studied for efficacy, they are scrutinized from any number of sides, especially on their performance for the intended job.

When dental materials are studied for efficacy, they are scrutinized from any number of sides, especially on their performance for the intended job.

by Dr. Nicholas Meyer — 

Years ago, the well-known biological dentist, Dr. Hal Huggins, said in a seminar that dental materials controlled the health of the immune system. At first it struck me as odd to hear this, but as he proceeded to illustrate evidence from study after study that supported his thesis, it did not take much more to convince me that he was right.

Going back further in time to about 1983, American dentist David Eggleston published a study based on two people that illustrated how placing either a single mercury amalgam filling or a nickel-based porcelain crown changed the T-cell profile of each individual’s blood profile within three days.

What a “wow” that was. Globally, when you consider the millions of people who go to the dentist to have any number of materials placed in their mouths to restore damaged or diseased tooth structures, the staggering number of immune systems being challenged is fantastic — almost too large to comprehend.

When dental materials are studied for efficacy, they are scrutinized from any number of sides, especially on their performance for the intended job. However, critical inquiry as to the body’s cellular response to those materials with respect to the immune system is not often addressed. Given the possible lifelong bodily stress such materials might produce, it would seem prudent to check people, especially those who have immune system disorders, prior to dental treatment. Several methods are available to check tolerance to dental materials.

The test Huggins developed some 20 years ago is known as the Serum Compatibility Test. The serum fraction of blood is subjected to the bulk of all dental materials that are available in the marketplace. A report is generated detailing those materials that are the most and least challenging to the immune system of the person tested. The practitioner then can use the results as a road map for the appropriate materials selection. Now the patient has a much higher level of personalized care than previously available.

Alternative type testing revolves around the resonance of the material and a person’s bioresonance — either through electronic units or muscle testing, which is a physical reaction of the autonomic nervous system to a substance. These tests are readily available in our area, but are not commonly found in many parts of the U.S.

The tests do not take long, and many materials can be screened rapidly. The only downside to resonance tests is the availability of materials to the tester.

Be an informed consumer when it comes to the placement of permanent dental implanted materials into your mouth.

 

Nicholas Meyer, D.D.S., D.N.M., is a general dentist in Scottsdale, Ariz., who specializes in developmental disturbances of the facial complex that contribute to such maladies as TMJ, snoring and sleep apnea. 480-948-0560, DrMeyer@milldental.com or www.milldental.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 32, Number 3, June/July 2013.

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