Dong Bing Xia Zhi for respiratory problems

This methodology comes from a philosophy in TCM called Dong (winter) Bing (disease) Xia (summer) Zhi (treatment), which means strengthening yang energy in the summer to prevent respiratory problems occurring in the winter.

by QiLing Lu — 

A special treatment called San Fu Jiu, based on the interconnection between earth, sky and the human body, is employed by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in the summer to reduce respiratory problems in the winter. San Fu Jiu strengthens immunity by using three treatments, along with acupuncture and herbs, that are natural yang (naturally hot) in the heat of summer.

This methodology comes from a philosophy in TCM called Dong (winter) Bing (disease) Xia (summer) Zhi (treatment), which means strengthening yang energy in the summer to prevent respiratory problems occurring in the winter. This helps colds, bronchitis, pneumonia, sinus infections and shortness of breath, which occur as a result of a deficiency in yang energy.

Yang deficiency increases mucus or phlegm, and/or dampness in the lungs and causes respiratory problems. San Fu Jiu uses acupuncture, cupping and herbs. San Fu means three parts of the summer season — early, middle and end — so treatments are done at those three times. One additional treatment, a “booster,” is given at the beginning of the winter season.

I spoke at a regional acupuncture conference in China about my study of the effectiveness of San Fu in more than 400 patients with respiratory diseases. Many patients who have used inhalers, allergy shots or medications, or other drugs reported a significant reduction in their use after receiving this treatment, aimed at increasing their immune systems.

San Fu is not often used on very young children because they are not able to fully cooperate with the treatment, but it does help adults and older children. Rather than thinking you will always have asthma or bronchitis, or that you will get a bad cold every winter, you may want to consider San Fu.

You can read more about this treatment in an article by Joseph Albans, M.S., Lac, in Acupuncture Today, May 2007 (Volume 8, Issue 5). www.acupuncturetoday.com.

 

QiLing Lu was a medical doctor in China and has practiced acupuncture for more than 20 years. She is board-certified by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and is licensed to practice acupuncture in Arizona. 602-954-2678 or www.drlu.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 26, Number 3, June/July 2007.

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