Elm for overwhelm

The healing influence of Elm is called for when we are faced with what Dr. Bach refers to as tasks that appear to be “too difficult and not within the power of a human being.”

by Linda Crider — 

A common complaint these days is that there is just too much to do and not enough time to do it in. Many of us fit in this category, and fortunately, Dr. Edward Bach anticipated such a state and included the essence of Elm in his 38 flower-remedy healing system.

Interestingly, the name of this remedy is also the word that best describes the state we are in when we need it — overwhelmed. This remedy is for those of us who are usually able to go merrily along multitasking. However, when the load gets too heavy, fear sets in and we can no longer manage all the responsibilities they have taken on.

These normally capable folks are like the sturdy and strong elm tree itself, with its huge trunk supporting many branches. Such individuals often tend to take on more “branches” than they can handle and find themselves overextended. They may become confused and mildly depressed and feel they have failed to live up to their own expectations, as well as those of others. Elm can help restore their customary can-do attitudes.

These feelings are most evident in today’s workplace, where rampant downsizing has resulted in higher expectations coupled with reduced resources. More work is expected from fewer people. Since these overworked employees are so overtaxed, it would be wise to include the Elm remedy as part of an office stress-reduction kit.

The feeling of being overwhelmed is not limited to the office. Overextended medical staff and customer service representatives, as well as teachers saddled with overstuffed classrooms, might also be in need of this remedy. Students of all ages and levels who juggle school, work and family would also benefit. A bottle of Elm might also be a thoughtful gift for new parents who are dismayed at the overwhelming set of responsibilities that accompany their newborn offspring.

Although it may be difficult to imagine, animals can also get to such a state — consider the canine or feline mother that has given birth to a large litter. She might find it difficult to manage her demanding brood of little ones.

Some individuals may have a tendency to be Elm types; however, this remedy is one we are all likely to need at some time. The healing influence of Elm is called for when we are faced with what Dr. Bach refers to as tasks that appear to be “too difficult and not within the power of a human being.”

Taking this remedy will not remove the demands of understaffed workplaces, never-ending parental responsibilities or life in general. But the balancing effect from Elm allows us to take a step back, along with a deep breath. We are then better able to prioritize, regroup and move forward.

 

Linda Crider, BFRP, specializes in flower essence therapy and is a Bach Foundation registered practitioner and founder of Blooming Vibrations, LLC. www.bloomingvibrations.com or 602-774-2382.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 31, Number 5, October/November 2012.

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