Fibromyalgia, fibrin and proteolytic enzymes

For the most part, people with fibromyalgia do not have a strong enzymatic capacity for producing enzymes that break down fibrin, let alone digest their food properly.

For the most part, people with fibromyalgia do not have a strong enzymatic capacity for producing enzymes that break down fibrin, let alone digest their food properly.

by Betsy Timmerman — 

It has long been known that people with chronic muscle pain or fibromyalgia have more fibrin in their tissues and blood. This fibrin, while initially helpful in the early stages of healing after an injury, can become problematic if the body does not clear itself of the agent after it has done its work.

Fibromyalgia sufferers experience micro-tears in their muscles from the normal activity of daily living — each and every day. But because the average fibromyalgia patient does not achieve and stay in stage 4 delta sleep at rest, growth hormone is not produced in enough quantities to heal these tears, which leads to more fibrin buildup.

For the most part, people with fibromyalgia do not have a strong enzymatic capacity for producing enzymes that break down fibrin, let alone digest their food properly. This leads to a buildup of fibrin, which over time catches red blood cells in a web of restriction. This fibrin causes a physical restriction of blood flow. Red blood cells literally become stuck, disabling them from getting into the capillaries to oxygenate and nourish the muscles where the metabolic waste that causes pain is removed.

The body uses fibrin to help heal itself after an injury. However, if you have poor blood flow and a lack of enzyme activity, fibrin will start to accumulate. If the injured area is slow to heal, fibrin accumulation appears as clumps of scar tissue in the muscles or at a surgical site.

Ultimately, if excess fibrin is present throughout the circulatory system, blood flow is restricted to areas of the body that need it most. Over time, the body compensates for this restriction by increasing its blood pressure. People with excess fibrin suffer from chronic fatigue, slow healing, inflammation and pain, as well as elevated blood pressure.

Proteolytic enzymes taken on an empty stomach break down these proteins into their smallest elements. The enzymes pass through the stomach and intestinal lining, and enter the bloodstream where they begin the process of breaking down the buildup in the muscles, connective tissue and blood. These enzymes bring nutrition and oxygen-rich blood that can remove the metabolic waste produced by inflammation and excess fibrin.

Serrapeptase has been proven to be the strongest of the proteolytic enzymes, inducing anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic and anti-edemic (prevents swelling and fluid retention) activity in a number of tissues.

Do not buy enzymes that list the dosage in milligrams (mgs) or have “proprietary enzyme blend” on the label. Enzymes are not measured in milligrams, and the term “proprietary blend” gives you no information on how much enzymatic activity you are getting from the product. Proteases are measured in HUT units.

Proteolytic enzymes have an overall positive safety record, but as with any supplement, there is always the risk of developing an allergy to one or more of the ingredients. If this should happen, discontinue use.

Using enzymes to clear your body of fibrin takes time. It takes years to develop webs of fibrin in your tissues — so be patient, log your usage and, over time, notice how much less pain and how much more flexibility you have.

 

Betsy Timmerman is a certified myotherapist and exercise therapist, a fibromyalgia educator and a therapeutic lifestyle educator. She works with people who suffer from pain but specializes in fibromyalgia recovery plans for patients stuck in their recovery. btzee6@gmail.com, eastwestpainsolutions.com or 623-251-7547.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 32, Number 2, April/May 2013.

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