Fulvic acid and mineral deficiency

Fulvic acid takes metallic mineral salts from the soil and changes these minerals into organic minerals that the plant utilizes.

It is estiminated that 99 percent of Americans are mineral deficient, which could be the cause of 60 different diseases. Researchers have known for years that at least 90 nutrients are needed to maintain optimal health — including a minimum of 59 minerals, 16 vitamins, 12 amino acids and three essential fatty acids.

Fulvic acid, a natural extract from ancient plant deposits, consists of an immense arsenal and array of naturally occurring phytochemicals, biochemicals, supercharged antioxidants, free-radical scavengers, superoxide dismutases, nutrients, enzymes, hormones, amino acids, antibiotics, antivirals and antifungals.

Not to be confused with folic acid, fulvic acid is a natural product made by plants. Fulvic acid has always occurred naturally in organic plants and mineral-rich soils with microbes on the plant root hairs, but only recently has come into use by those who understand its amazing benefits.

Scientists have found that fulvic acid is a powerful, natural electrolyte that can eradicate any form of free radical. It can act as an acceptor or as a donor in the creation of electrochemical balance and is needed by plants and humans to absorb minerals to stay healthy.

According to Sesesi Y. Chen and M. Schnitzer, authors of Soil Biology and Biochemistry, fulvic acid has the ability to dramatically reduce the oxidative effects of free radicals. This means fulvic acid could potentially help your body ward off disorders such as cancer, premature aging, wrinkles and arthritis, all of which are hastened by oxidation.

Fulvic acid takes metallic mineral salts from the soil and changes these minerals into organic minerals that the plant utilizes. It purifies and refines nutrients into ionic forms for easier cell utilization, and transports many times its own weight in nutrients directly into cells. Fulvic acid has been missing from our food for decades because farming practices dating back to the 1930s have destroyed the microbes in the soil.

 

Resource: britannica.com, wikipedia.org, merc-buyers.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 26, Number 5, October/November 2007.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Web Analytics