How to eliminate food cravings

If snacking does not do the trick, sniffing might. According to Alan Hirsch, M.D., neurological director of the Smell and Taste Research Foundation in Chicago, just a whiff of green apple, banana or peppermint might help you drop some weight.

by Joanne Henning Tedesco — 

If you are overwhelmed with an urge to wolf down chocolate or cookies, you should head straight to the kitchen. Although mindless snacking packs on the pounds like no other pastime, certain foods can make a difference in your need to nibble.

Dietitians will tell you that eating low-calorie, fiber-rich foods before a meal, such as salads, soup and fruits, may prevent a dieter from overeating. But some of the best appetite killers may be hiding in plain sight in your kitchen. Some of these include:

Nuts — New research shows the fatty acids in pine nuts initiate the release of an appetite-suppressing hormone called cholecystokinin (CKK). Time will tell if these results stand up, but in the meantime, sprinkle pine nuts on your salad or mix them into pesto over whole-wheat pasta. Want a more accessible nut? Try almonds. People who consume these nutrient powerhouses lose more weight and fat mass than those who does not, because the cell walls of almonds seem to act as a physical barrier to the total absorption of fat.

Hot stuff — Spicy foods have a metabolism-boosting benefit and can dull your taste buds so you eat less. Even foods that are hot in temperature, like soup or tea, may diminish your appetite. Limit your soups to tomato- or broth-based and choose tea that is not of the sugary variety. If you go green, it may actually boost your metabolism.

Apples — Apples pack a lot of fiber — twice that of peaches, grapes or grapefruit. Fiber makes you feel full, curbing the appetite.

Green leaves — Two cups of cabbage, celery or lettuce provide very few calories and it is possible for you to burn off the greens just by digesting them. Pickles and cucumbers also fall into this category, but watch the dressings.

If snacking does not do the trick, sniffing might. According to Alan Hirsch, M.D., neurological director of the Smell and Taste Research Foundation in Chicago, just a whiff of green apple, banana or peppermint might help you drop some weight.

Joanne Henning Tedesco is editor of AzNetNews.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 25, Number 3, June/July 2006.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Web Analytics