Japanese food — a friendly, healthy dining experience

Japanese food is made with the healthiest, freshest foods.

Japanese food is made with the healthiest, freshest foods.

by Stan Kalson — 

Japanese food uses the healthiest, freshest foods in a wide variety of sushi, salads, soups, sauces, dressing, white and brown rice. Grilling is used to insure less fat for the health-conscious eater. Green tea as a healthy beverage choice. Try the following recipes to spice up your kitchen.

Grilled Salmon with Teriyaki Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 4 salmon fillets
  • 2 tablespoons of tamari soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon of evaporated sugar cane
  • 2 teaspoons sake or dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon of mirin (available at most health food stores)

Instructions:

Mix ingredients for the teriyaki sauce, making sure the sugar dissolves completely. Marinate the fish in the sauce for 10 minutes, turning the fish over. Remove fish from the marinade and grill two minutes on each side. Brush marinade on the fish and grill for one to two minutes more. Don’t overcook, as this will dry the fish out and ruin the taste and texture. Serve immediately with lemon wedges. Add a side of steamed vegetables and brown rice. Option: use fresh tuna or free range/organic chicken. Serves 4.

Wasabi Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3/4 cup organic whole milk
  • 1 to 2 cloves garlic
  • 4 tablespoons wasabi powder
  • 1/4 cup butter

Instructions:

Place potatoes in a large pot of cold, salted water with one or two garlic cloves. Boil until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain. Return to pot and mash. Add additional seasonings, e.g., salt and pepper to taste. Combine 3/4 cup milk and one to four tablespoons wasabi powder in small bowl. Stir to dissolve powder. Add milk mixture and butter to potatoes. Use electric mixer to beat potatoes until fluffy and smooth.

Green Beans in Spicy Miso Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sesame oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 cup onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups green beans, ends trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon diluted shiro miso
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup or barley malt syrup
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with 3 teaspoons cold water

Instructions:

In a large skillet, heat oils and sauté garlic for 30 seconds. Add the onion and sauté until translucent. Add green beans and sauté three to five minutes. Dilute miso with two tablespoons cold water. Mix cornstarch with three teaspoons cold water. Mix dissolved miso, syrup, mirin and starch together. Add to the hot beans, stirring constantly for about one minute, until thick. Serve as a side dish, or use as a main dish when served over rice, pasta, or other grains.

 

Stan Kalson is the founder and director of the International Holistic Center, Inc. www.holisticresources.org.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 24, Number 6, December 2005/January 2006.

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