Let massage therapy turn your pond into a river

Let massage therapy turn your pond into a river

by Shannon Tinder —

Our bodies are mostly water. When we do not move them regularly, parts of us get stagnant and congested, separated from the flow by big boulders of tension and pain.

Our bodies are mostly water. When we do not move them regularly, parts of us get stagnant and congested, separated from the flow by big boulders of tension and pain.

Come walk along the river with me. The birds are diving down to feed on fish as we brush past the vibrant shrubs and grasses growing along the banks, drinking of the fresh river water. Sounds of the gentle currents soothe our minds. Off to the side, we come to a little pond of water, far enough from its source that has become stagnant, stinky and has many little bugs floating on top.

We came to this place for a refreshing swim. Which water source would you rather swim in — the river or the pond? Unless you are wanting that all-natural mud bath, you will probably choose the river. Most people would.

Our bodies are mostly water. When we do not move them regularly, parts of us get stagnant and congested, separated from the flow by big boulders of tension and pain. One of those parts is the lymphatic system, which moves only by exercise or massage. The lymphatic system is responsible for our immune defense and cleansing our blood. It is vital to keep it stimulated and moving as our cells float around in these fluids.

Regular massage will assist in keeping your immune system healthy and your internal waters flowing. Massage improves circulation, relaxes and nourishes all of the body’s systems and provides an overall feeling of peace and well-being.

So, ask your cells where they would prefer to swim.

 

Shannon Tinder is a licensed massage therapist, Reiki practitioner and herbalist. 480-720-7269.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 23, Number 1, February/March 2005.

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