Lost your libido? How women can help themselves

A woman’s libido can be a difficult topic to discuss.

by Dr. Denise Grobe — 

Many women report to their physicians that they have experienced a decrease in libido. While this is not a problem for some women, it can present a multitude of complicated issues for others.

A woman’s libido can be a difficult topic to discuss. No scientific or medical standards have been created or any norms established for a person’s sex drive. So medically speaking, the person who wants to have sex once a day is just as normal as the person who wants to have sex once a month. Complications arise when two people in a relationship have different sex drives.

Women also may experience a change in libido over time. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, 43 percent of women report having some change in sexual desire, ranging from the inability to orgasm to complete lack of sexual interest.

There are many reasons why women may experience a change in libido. The causes can be complex and attributed to stress, depression, anxiety, fatigue, negative body image, relationship problems, medications such as SSRIs, birth control pills and hypertension medications, and/or hormonal changes.

If a change in libido is dramatically affecting your life and/or your romantic relationships, discuss medical treatment options with your physician. This may include changing or adjusting dosages of medications such as antidepressants or birth control methods. Discussion should also include treatments for specific complaints such as vaginal dryness or inability to orgasm, and hormone therapy options.

Many over-the-counter (OTC) options are available for treatment that target the stress, depression, anxiety and fatigue aspects of a lagging libido. Most of the OTC natural female libido enhancers contain herbs and vitamins that calm and sedate, as well as support the adrenal glands. Examples are licorice, ginger, hops, valerian and passion flower.

 

Dr. Denise Q. Grobe is a naturopathic physician who focuses on integrative women’s wellness at The Center for True Harmony Wellness & Medicine. www.trueharmonywellness.com or 480-539-6646.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 28, Number 2, Apr/May 2009.

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