Microcurrent for macular degeneration

July 29, 2012

Eyes, Health, Self-improvement, Vision

The leading cause of blindness in older adults and the most common degenerative condition affecting the retina is age-related macular degeneration (ARMD).

by Julia Busch — 

The leading cause of blindness in older adults and the most common degenerative condition affecting the retina is age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). It targets the retina’s central portion, the macula, which is responsible for sharp central vision. With its progression, all retinal cells are affected, including connective tissue and blood vessels.

In later stages, decreased blood flow to and deterioration in the structure of the retina can cause bleeding or exudative (wet) macular degeneration. At its most advanced, one is unable to read, drive, watch TV or recognize faces.

The underlying cause appears to be a genetic abnormality in the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene (ABCR). The defect also links to fundus flavimaculatus, retinitis pigmentosa, cone and cone-rod dystrophy.

Interestingly, a very high percentage of wet and dry ARMD and its juvenile counterpart, Stargart’s disease (STDG), can be improved by employing a highly sophisticated microcurrent (mcs) device which emits specific, low-current bioelectrical waves.

Penetrating the cell, mcs pick up where the body’s electrical current fails. The oscillating polarity of deficient cells neutralizes them, normalizing cell activity. Such effects include ATP and collagen production, protein synthesis, oxygenation, ion exchange, nutrient absorption and waste elimination increase.

Microcurrent can, likewise, normalize aging facial tissue, improving blood flow and reeducating muscles to respond more effectively to regular nerve stimulation. As flaccid and over-contracted muscles balance, the face experiences healthier tones and wrinkles diminish.

Microcurrent stimulation for ARMD requires four five-minute sessions daily; facial units need only one five-minute session. Hand-held units are easy to use, painless and appear remarkably safe. Results are cumulative, but treatment must be ongoing for improvement to continue.

Reference: “ABCR Unites What Ophthalmologists Divide,” van Driel, MA, et al, Ophthalmic Genetetics, 1998 Sep;19(3):117-22.

 

Julia Busch is president of Anti-Aging Press, Inc., editor of the So Young™ anti-aging holistic newsletter and author of 10 books. For a free in-depth report on microcurrent for macular degeneration to facial toning, call 800-SO-YOUNG (800-769-6864) or julia2@gate.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 2, April/May 2008.

 

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