Natural help for chronic inflammation

From cardiovascular disease and arterial plaque bursting like popcorn, to cancer, depression, asthma, and diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, chronic inflammation is thought to be the underlying culprit.

by Julia Busch — 

While acute inflammation is an automatic immune response to help heal injury and disease, it can kill when it becomes chronic. From cardiovascular disease and arterial plaque bursting like popcorn, to cancer, depression, asthma, and diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, chronic inflammation is thought to be the underlying culprit.

Unchecked joint inflammation can eat up cartilage, or an inflamed pancreas can cause Type 2 diabetes. Allergies, anemia, aortic valve stenosis, congestive heart failure, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus, kidney failure, psoriasis, stroke, macular degeneration, osteoporosis, periodontal disease … all exhibit excess levels of pro-inflammatory markers. In fact, chronic inflammation may be at the root of all degenerative disease, says Andrew Weil, M.D.

Aging diminishes the body’s ability to check its inflammatory response. Understandably, then, individuals can prematurely age due to chronic inflammation. Natural help includes curbing the Standard American Diet — trans fats, refined carbs, artificial sweeteners — as well as chlorinated/fluoridated water, unrelenting stress, sleep deprivation and environmental pollutants.

Herbs can help improve individual issues and antioxidants can quench resulting free radicals. Serratia peptidase, a natural proteolytic enzyme or protein digestant, may be of great value for those taking anti-inflammatory medications or who are looking to relieve pain, reduce inflammation and promote cardiovascular health. Derived from the silkworm, this enzyme has been used in Europe and Asia for more than 25 years.

Serratia peptidase, a natural supplement, is thought to reduce inflammation by thinning the fluids formed as a result of injury, facilitating fluid drainage and encouraging tissue repair. It may help alleviate pain by inhibiting the release of pain-inducing amines called bradykinin. Additionally, it may enhance cardiovascular health and arterial cleansing by breaking down the protein byproducts of blood coagulation called fibrin without harming living tissue.

Because the enzyme dissolves all nonliving tissue, including blood clots and cysts, it is used to treat a variety of conditions, including sprains and torn ligaments; postoperative swelling; venous thrombosis (clots in the legs); ear, nose (sinusitis) and throat infections; and atherosclerosis.

 

Julia Busch is president of Anti-Aging Press, Inc., editor of the So Young™ anti-aging holistic newsletter and author of 10 books. 800-SO-YOUNG (800-769-6864) or julia2@gate.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 26, Number 4, August/September 2007.

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