Reasonable treatment for an enlarged prostate

When the prostate becomes enlarged, as it tends to do starting around age 30, it presses on the urethra, causing obstruction of urine flow, diminished urinary stream and sometimes complete urinary obstruction.

by Dr. Martha Grout — 

The prostate gland completely surrounds the urethra, making it the single most troublesome gland of the male reproductive system. When the prostate becomes enlarged, as it tends to do starting around age 30, it presses on the urethra, causing obstruction of urine flow, diminished urinary stream and sometimes complete urinary obstruction.

So, what is a guy to do? He cannot help getting older. He finds himself getting up two or three times during the night to urinate; he feels as though his bladder does not empty completely; and perhaps he gets a bladder infection which requires treatment with antibiotics. His doctor is talking about urologists.

Standard allopathic therapy uses the techniques of burning, slashing and poisoning to treat the enemy — in this case the enlarged prostate, urinary obstruction or inability to urinate.

The idea of prostate surgery is not so exciting. Three varieties of surgical treatment are available, some of which combine both slashing and burning: TURP, transurethral resection of the prostate — the removal of prostatic tissue through the urethra; TUMT, trans-urethral microwave thermotherapy, coagulates prostatic tissue and reduces its size by cooking it with microwaves; and TUNA, which uses radio frequency waves sent into prostatic tissue through needles placed directly into the prostate. TUMT and TUNA both are less invasive than TURP, but neither reduces the size of the gland as much as TURP.

Medical therapy utilizes prescription drugs like Hytrin®, which relaxes the prostate’s hold on the urethra, somewhat relieving obstruction. Drugs like Propecia® are used to reduce the conversion of testosterone to DHT, thereby somewhat shrinking the size of the prostate. Alas, these drugs may also shrink the size of erections, an unfortunate side-effect in perhaps five percent of men.

Is there no therapy for enlarged prostate which does not treat the gland like an enemy to be destroyed? Let us look.

The prostate provides about 20 percent of the volume of seminal fluid, the fluid ejaculated by the male at sexual climax. It contains large numbers of thyroid hormone receptors. Women’s breasts also contain large numbers of these same thyroid hormone receptors. Since a woman’s breasts and the man’s prostate are the two largest accessory sexual organs, it is not unreasonable to suspect that the thyroid hormone plays some role in their function.

We know the American population, at large, is iodine deficient. We also know that iodine deficiency has been linked to fibrocystic breast disease and breast cancer. When a woman with fibrocystic breasts is treated with iodine, the fibrocystic breasts soften and return to normal. It would not be unreasonable to conclude that the same thing could happen if men with enlarged prostate were treated with iodine. Nature tends to be fairly conservative and does not invent new processes when the old ones are perfectly adequate to the task.

Prostate cancer has been associated with decreased total body levels of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), vitamin E and selenium and other micronutrient deficiencies.

Reasonable treatment of enlarged prostate would involve the use of all the above nutrients — iodine, vitamin D3, vitamin E and a good multi-mineral and vitamin preparation — to ensure that all known micronutrients are supplied to the body. Your homeopathic or naturopathic doctor can help you determine which nutrients are needed, and the best preparations to use.

Prostate problems are not inevitable as you age. Make sure you consume the proper nutrients so you can think kindly of that most important gland well into your old age.

 

Martha Grout, M.D., M.D.(H), serves on the Arizona State Board of Homeopathic Medical Examiners and formerly sat on the Arizona State Board of Acupuncture. Her clinic is in Scottsdale, Ariz. 480-240-2600.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 26, Number 4, August/September 2007.

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