Rock on, Stones

How cool the world would be if we could all see life as a stage and, thereupon, just lived it, striving to be healthy, energetic, creative and positive.

by Dannette Hunnel — 

While daydreaming through the drudgery of my workout one recent afternoon, one of my favorite Rolling Stones songs came on the radio. I, lacking the stamina of days gone by, noticed the song gave me that little extra pep to get through the last few minutes on the treadmill. Once again, I was grateful to the Stones. The experience set me into a thought pattern which inspired me to write this article.

In early February, the Rolling Stones performed during halftime at the Superbowl. Many of us around the country — and around the world — watched our TVs aghast, asking the same question, “How do these old farts still do it?” We are amazed that after what seems to be a lifetime of bodily abuse and parties, these four lads are still rockin’ and rollin.’

What is their secret? Well, I think I may have figured it out.

First and foremost is their positive attitude. With the exception of “I can’t get no satisfaction,” have you ever heard any of them publicly emit a negative word or discuss a negative situation? Not I! The Stones appear to look at life as a constant party; their glasses are always half-full and they find the fun in all they do.

Next, exercise. Who do you know that jiggles around as much as Mick Jagger? At 60 years of age no less! And what of those other blokes — standing, moving, strumming and drumming for extended periods of time? What a workout.

I fail to visualize any of them in a La-Z-Boy recliner, channel surfing, waiting for this week’s episode of “Grey’s Anatomy.”

Do the Stones worship Monday Night Football? I think not! Then there is the fact that they obviously love what they do — for if not, at their age and wealthy stature, they certainly would have long since ceased to continue performing.

I guess I should mention (with tongue in cheek) that they obviously play the role of “young at heart” — have you seen some of their wives and girlfriends? I am not advocating dating someone 30 years younger, but perhaps devoting more time to our children or grandchildren, volunteering for programs like Big Brothers Big Sisters, or coaching youngsters’ sports leagues would expose us to a more youthful lifestyle, as well as enabling us to give time to some very good causes.

As for the Stones, let us not overlook their creativity. It is said that once we stop becoming creative, we die. Creativity does not necessarily mean putting out gold records. It can take many forms, such as organizing events (regardless of size), crafts, cooking and baking, cleaning, decorating, playing music, spending time with a small child, writing, training an animal — the list goes on and on. Most importantly, creativity usually means giving enjoyment to others, as well as to yourself.

Lastly, the Stones work at getting along with each other — they overlook annoying habits, accept one another and praise one another. This is apparent through their ability to work closely together for so long. It is significant to note that, in the beginning, the four young men chose their band name, the Rolling Stones, which represents continuous movement. How many of us, way back when, would have guessed the Rolling Stones would become some of history’s most admired, successful and, possibly, even healthiest men?

How cool the world would be if we could all see life as a stage and, thereupon, just lived it, striving to be healthy, energetic, creative and positive.

Obviously to me, the Rolling Stones have indeed gotten their satisfaction. It will be interesting to see just how long their greatness and physical capacity continues. Until then, I say, “Rock on, Stones. Your stamina and love of life have been an inspiration.”

“I like it, love it, yes, I do.”

 

Dannette Ellenwood Hunnel is a homeopath, a national health and wellness columnist and author of Shorten The Distance at www.authorhouse.com/books. 602-354-2596.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 25, Number 2, April/May 2006.

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