Rolfing and chronic pain

January 14, 2014

Exercise, Pain, Rolfing

by Deanna Melnychuk — 

You participate through movement and breath work, as the rolfer uses hands, fingers, arms and elbows to loosen and release restricted areas. The end result is relief from chronic pain, greater flexibility, enhanced vitality and greater energy.

You participate through movement and breath work, as the rolfer uses hands, fingers, arms and elbows to loosen and release restricted areas. The end result is relief from chronic pain, greater flexibility, enhanced vitality and greater energy.

When chronic pain envelops you, it is hard to be a concerned parent, a loving spouse or a dedicated employee. Your whole life becomes wrapped up in the next tablet to ease the pain.

Rolfing can help alleviate certain kinds of chronic pain. These are pains caused by the shortening, tightening and hardening of the connective tissue that surrounds our organs, bones and nerve cells and permeates all our muscles.

Connective tissue is a constant friend, helping support and protect wounds. However, as the cells that create connective tissue multiply, they do not have the ability to simply zip a wound closed — they send tendrils deep into the body. These tendrils then hook on to nearby muscles, organs or bones and begin pulling on that other body part, eventually causing discomfort and then pain.

One way to avoid this is to become active again as soon as possible after surgery or injury. Stretching, walking and movement help dissolve unnecessary connective tissue. There may come a time when the accumulation of connective tissue dysfunction from many accidents, surgeries or life habits is so great that even strenuous activity can no longer bring you back to prime. In this event, you might want to consider bodywork such as Rolfing Structural Integration.

In rolfing, the tissues are lengthened, realigned and softened. Results are often immediate, and there is continued improvement throughout the 10-session series. The sessions are generally two to three weeks apart, taking about six months to complete. After that, tune-ups once or twice a year help you regain realignment lost through daily living.

Chronic backache may be a result of overworked quads and/or a tight psoas. Rolfing helps rebalance the body. In this case, the quads would be relaxed and balanced with the hamstrings and the psoas would be encouraged to release and find balance with the abdominal muscles. You’d be amazed at how your hips can change position from diagonal to horizontal, and how horizontal hips can better support a vertical spine and shoulder girdle, allowing the head to move backward with ease. The result? No more neck pain.

Each session lasts between 75 and 90 minutes. You participate through movement and breath work, as the rolfer uses hands, fingers, arms and elbows to loosen and release restricted areas. The end result is relief from chronic pain, greater flexibility, enhanced vitality and greater energy. Why wait to ease your daily discomfort? Investigate the possibilities of Rolfing Structural Integration now.

 

Deanna Melnychuk, B.Sc., is a certified advanced rolfer and rolfing® movement practitioner, licensed massage therapist, Reiki Master, craniosacral therapist and reflexologist. 602-404-8685.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 24, Number 3, June/July 2005.

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