The rise of spiritual cinema

Broad in its approach and content, spiritual cinema addresses issues of love, death, rebirth, evolution and the science of transformation.

Broad in its approach and content, spiritual cinema addresses issues of love, death, rebirth, evolution and the science of transformation.

by Cate Montana —

The new millennium has seen a lot of social changes. One of the most inspiring is the development of a new film genre called “spiritual cinema.”

Broad in its approach and content, spiritual cinema addresses issues of love, death, rebirth, evolution and the science of transformation. The depths of human psychology and emotion, our endeavors and our dreams, our greatest fears and our greatest hopes all provide material for this sensitive, developing genre which takes multiple forms, including features, documentaries and hybrid films.

The popularity of recent movies like “Indigo,” “What Dreams May Come” and “What the Bleep Do We Know!?” has revealed a public hunger for deeper film experiences and a desire for intelligent answers to the perennial questions of “Who are we?” and “Why are we here?”

Verification of consciousness, mystical states and psi phenomenon from scientific studies and sources are highlighting the accuracy of many ancient spiritual traditions. Science and spirituality, after holding opposite camps for so many centuries, are now merging into a new framework of social thought.

The fact that “What the Bleep” set box office records shows this consciousness movement is going mainstream. In fact, the demand for information on science and spirituality has been so great that an extended version of the movie, titled “What the Bleep — Down the Rabbit Hole,” is now in release. The new version contains two hours of new information, new scientists, new interviews and deeper explanations of vital experiments in quantum physics.

Forget “Dumb and Dumber.” Movie audiences are growing up and demanding a greater mirror for humanity. When mainstream distributors are interested in movies with content like this, it shows just how ready the world is for spiritual cinema and a new paradigm in entertainment media.

 

Cate Montana is a freelance writer specializing in the fields of consciousness studies, spirituality, quantum physics, biology and alternative health. stellar@ywave.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 25, Number 1, February/March 2006.

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