Treating the elusive MARConS infection

Treating the elusive MARConS infection

Tissue biopsy results confirmed ischemic bone disease that resulted from the removal of a lower molar more than eight years ago.

Tissue biopsy results confirmed ischemic bone disease that resulted from the removal of a lower molar more than eight years ago.

by Dr. Nicholas Meyer — 

Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker, a medical doctor from Pokomoke, Maryland, is an outside-of-the-box thinker. He has almost single-handedly awakened the medical community to the problem of “water intrusions” in the body, which can lead to mold(s) forming where the intrusion occurs, and then moving into your body.

Of particular interest to him was the identification of a cousin of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) — multiple antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus coagulase negative (MARConS). It is found to live in the nasal passages and is extremely difficult to treat.

My involvement with MARConS came about through an almost miraculous recovery of a retired physician who had been in hospice care not long prior to my meeting him. His physician referred him to me because he complained of chronic facial pain.

We spoke by phone, during which time I was informed of tests and bugs I had never heard of. He then had current radiographs made and shipped to me, and we consulted by phone once again.

He came in for an examination and an initial diagnostic anesthetic blockade — a relatively simple test. Within about 10 minutes, his pain was gone.

A surgical procedure was later performed, and the pain source was eradicated. Tissue biopsy results confirmed ischemic bone disease that resulted from the removal of a lower molar more than eight years ago. In a follow-up nasal culture, no evidence of MARConS was present. This was a serendipitous outcome of the treatment protocol I followed, and it gave Shoemaker a new lead in the treatment of MARConS infections.

I have been invited to participate in a controlled study to determine the benefits of my treatment protocol on a larger group of subjects. Perhaps it can benefit sufferers of this debilitating disease. As of this writing, I have already identified this organism in teeth that were removed for reasons of infections. Since this bug has been found outside of the nasal passages, it may answer questions as to why people are getting sicker and sicker without being helped. Stay tuned.

 

Nicholas Meyer, D.D.S., D.N.M., is a general dentist in Scottsdale, Ariz., who has a special interest in developmental disturbances of the facial complex that contribute to such maladies as TMJ, snoring and sleep apnea. milldental.com, drmeyer@milldental.com or 480-948-0560.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 35, Number 1, February/March 2016.

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