Water, water everywhere … but not a drop to drink

Bisphenol A, a synthetic hormone that mimics estrogen, is used to make hard plastics for water bottles, baby bottles and sippy cups, among other things.

by Reza Bakhshai — 

Do you think the bottled water you drink from the dispenser at your home or office is safe? How about the bottle you carry with you everywhere? The answers to these questions may surprise you.

Plastic is manufactured from petroleum. This process involves the use of chemicals, many of which have not been sufficiently tested for their toxicological impact on humans or animals. Bisphenol A, a synthetic hormone that mimics estrogen, is used to make hard plastics for water bottles, baby bottles and sippy cups, among other things.

As you probably have seen in the news, reusing or reheating plastic releases BPA into your water, so bottled water left in your car or stored in your garage will become contaminated by the Arizona heat. This also includes the five-gallon jugs that sit in the back of delivery trucks.

And what about those five-gallon jugs? When was the last time you disinfected the neck of the jug? It sat in a warehouse, was handled by many people and then flipped onto a cooler where bacteria thrive, since the neck of the bottle sits at room temperature. So, why struggle with heavy, unsanitary jugs or finding enough room for storage to have “clean” water?

An alternative to research and consider is a reverse osmosis cooler. It is far less expensive than a system for your entire house and eliminates the use of harmful plastics.

 

Reza Bakhshai operates Entirely Water and is devoted to educating the public and businesses on plastic waste, as well as the harmful effects of plastic use. 480-776-5883 or www.Entirelywater.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number , December 2008/January 2009.

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